Canton Tornado

2017 Canton Tornado

April 29, 2017 is a day I will never forget. My name is David Broussard and I am a metal artist/sculptor who lives in Canton Texas. I display my work every month at the world famous Canton First Monday Trade Days which has taken place every month for well over 100 years. Thousands of people were out enjoying themselves and the weather called for thunderstorms that would take place later that night, but around 4:00 pm, the weather started turning for the worse. Sirens went off and there were tornado warning alerts on my phone every few minutes. People started scrambling for their cars and vendors started closing their shops.

A little after 5:00 pm, I grabbed a ride home with Shannon and Becky Cunningham, vendors from Louisiana who stay in our guest house. It was raining hard and the sky was very dark. When I got home, Michelle was soaked and her bible was wet. She had been standing in the back yard speaking the Word of God over the storm. She was declaring Psalm 91 over our life, our property, our friends and neighbors. When I put my things up, I joined her.

I remember us standing in the back yard, facing southwest and looking at this wall of terror coming at us. You could hear it in the distance. All of a sudden, the wind stopped and not a leaf was moving on any of the trees. It was like watching a horror movie where there’s a moment of silence before the monster springs out of nowhere to snatch its prey. That is truly what it was like. The wind started to pick up again and the sound of the tornado grew all the more intense. It is a sound that I will never forget as long as I live. I’ve heard people talk about tornados sounding like a freight train but I could never quiet understand it. If you’ve ever been close to a train traveling at full speed, there is a rumble that is very distinct. What I heard was like several trains at one time.

At the same time Shannon and Becky were standing outside the guest house and Becky was watching the swings in our front oak tree. She saw them swing high back and forth, but then they blew up into the tree and disappeared. She yelled at Shannon to get in the house. They were also standing in agreement with us, praying Psalm 91.

When the wind started blowing harder where we could no longer safely stand in the back yard, we ran into the house and stood in a room behind the brick fireplace. Michelle and I did not lay down but stood in that room declaring the Word over our lives, our house, our property and the same for our neighbors.

I have to say that even though we were very concerned about the intensity of the moment and our hearts were racing, we were not fearful. We were not freaking out at all. When I think back over the brief moments that this storm from hell was on us, we stood firm and declared the salvation of the Lord on our lives. “Though a thousand fall at my side, even 10,000 at my right hand, it will not come upon me. Only with my eyes shall I look upon the destruction.” We declared and believed it would not touch our dwelling place. I had my arms around Michelle and told her I loved her and that we were going to be fine. We definitely were standing in agreement.

While were were inside declaring the Word over us, we did not hear anything except our voices. We have many windows in our home and not a single window vibrated. After maybe a couple of minutes, we paused and it was eerily quiet and still. We went to a side door of our home and looked out the window and the sky was a lighter gray and we saw some branches on the ground. I remember Michelle saying she was surprised that it wasn’t that bad after all. Then we stepped out of the house and looked to the back yard and were blown away by what we saw. One of our oaks by the patio was snapped off at the ground. A huge tulip poplar, about 2.5 feet at its base, which is only five feet from our back door was snapped off right at the top of our roof line. The even bigger poplar at the corner of our back yard was completely pushed over and uprooted, destroying a section of steel fence. We have huge 2 – 3 foot in diameter Blue Spruce trees all over our property that were snapped in two like pencils.

 

There are 4 metal buildings in back of our home. The first one is an RV shed which we do not put to use. Heavily damaged! Next to it is Michelle’s office with an attached warehouse for inventory etc. We use it daily. It is completely intact. Next to it is another building that we don’t use that was destroyed.

Across from it was a double carport steel building where I keep my trailer in which I store all my display for shows. It was destroyed by a cedar that fell on it, but it stopped about three inches from the top of the trailer. Last of all, the biggest building where I do my metal work, which contains all of my equipment and tools was completely untouched except for the weather head that brings electricity to the building. One of the big trees that fell ripped it from the building. There are four long metal vents on top of the roof. They were completely intact yet a three foot spruce directly behind the building about 20 feet from vents was snapped off just a few feet higher than the vents. The other cedar of the same size is pushed over and crashed into another cedar of the same size and broke it at the base.

Another surprise was our radio antenna, which is our only source for internet signal was not damaged, yet was equally as high and in line with the trees only a few feet away.

My van that I use for shows was parked three feet from the building that was the most heavily damaged. In fact, the porch in front of the building was completely destroyed and tin was laying everywhere, but the van was untouched. We have a tower that is as tall as the trees that is connected to Michelle’s office where she makes jewelry. This is where we get our signal for our cell phones and internet. Without it, we can’t run our business. It is no more than 20 feet from one tree and 30 feet from the other, directly in between them. The trees were snapped off and yet that tower which we must have for communication was intact.

Now after a day of having the road cleaned where we can get out, we saw the scope of our experience. This storm came at us from the Southwest where it completely destroyed many homes and beautiful trees. We were dead center in the path of this monster storm. The biggest oaks are on the south side of our house and all the trees that were destroyed fell to the north. These huge oaks would have destroyed our home. When the tornado reached our property, it took out a few trees at the front, lifted over these oaks and our house, destroying only the trees behind our home, either by snapping the tops which were higher than our roofline or uprooting them. The buildings in the back that we use were also untouched. After it got over our property, the storm dropped back on the ground and almost completely devastated the community behind us.

On Monday morning, Mike Charles, a master electrician and new friend showed up at my door and asked if I needed any help. He helped me pick out a generator and hooked it up to our home so our food would not spoil and also for basic lighting etc in the house. Early Tuesday morning he showed up again to fix the weather head for my workshop. Without it, I would not be able to get power to the building. We worked about an hour just clearing the trees out to have space to work.

While Mike and I were working on my shop, Michelle was feeling overwhelmed. She was wondering how on earth we were going to clean up the mess on our property. We had major trees down all over our buildings to the back plus two in our back yard and we didn’t have the equipment nor the man power to do it. She prayed for help. About two hours later, eight men and two women showed up with chain saws, a tractor and a skid steer which can pick up whole trees easily. They worked tirelessly for around five hours and then there were gone. We know a couple of them, so we know they were not angels. Within an hour of them being done with the cleanup, Mike and I finished bolting on the meter box and power head to my workshop. As we were tightening the last bolt to secure it to the side of the building, T-VEC, our electric provider, showed up to connect us back to the main line. It was the most amazing day. If those guys had not shown up to help with the cleanup, T-VEC would not have been able to do their job and our power up would have been delayed.

 

We experienced a miracle that is beyond anything that has ever happened in our life. Our God protected us from all harm. He is faithful to deliver all who will call upon His great Name and believe that He truly is able to do what His Word says. His Name is Jesus of Nazareth, The Creator of Heaven and Earth. We continue to pray for the people on both sides of our property. By the grace of God our place does not look like the photo below, which was taken in the neighborhood behind our home. The trees you can see in the background is our property which is about 500 yards away. Several of our friends lived here and we are so thankful that no lives were lost. They will soon start the rebuilding process and life will go on.

“One Nation Under God” Installation and Dedication

On April 15th, 2017, we donated and dedicated “One Nation Under God” to The Coming King Sculpture Prayer Garden in Kerrville, TX.

 

“One Nation Under God”

Six hundred and thirteen nails form the shape of Messiah’s cross, representing the 613 laws found in the Old Testament Torah, the five books of Moses.

Yeshua, Jesus the Christ, knew no sin and was the perfect, spotless Lamb of God. He died on the cross, taking upon Himself the sins of all mankind so whoever believes in Him shall have eternal life.

Israel is the nation God chose to bring forth His Messiah for the salvation of man. Jesus of Nazareth, the son of David was born of the Jews. The church is forever tied to Israel and this sculpture tells the story of the deliverance of Israel from the bondage of Egypt and also the deliverance of mankind from the bondage of sin and the Law.

Photos from the Installation

David and Jose getting things into place.

David with Max Greiner, Jr

Hope for the Hopeless

As I was reviewing our web traffic over the last 2 years I noticed an interesting fact. In 2014, the #1 non-Jeweled Steel related search term that led people to our website was forgiveness. In 2015, that search term was hopeless. I do feel that this is the general state of our world. Most people are without hope because they don’t believe in the One that brings hope. Personally, I believe that many Christians are without hope even though they have accepted Jesus as Lord of their life. Why is this? Maybe most Christians have placed their hope in themselves, their programs, their religions or their money instead of cultivating a relationship with Jesus Christ.

Christians should be the most hopeful group of people around. Instead we look pretty much like those who have no hope. It is time for us to lay down what we think we know and trust the One who spoke everything into existence. Believe that He is not an angry God and He is not out to get you. He is happy and in a good mood!

Let the verses below penetrate your heart and ask the Holy Spirit to help you renew your thinking so that you actually believe what the Word of God says concerning you. We have a hopeful future in spite of our circumstances. Our God NEVER changes!
Jeremiah 29:11

For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the Lord, thoughts of peace, and not evil, to give you a hopeful end.

God is for us!

John 10:10

The thief comes only to steal, kill and destroy. I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.

An abundant life = a hopeful life

Mark 4:40

And He said to them, Why are you so fearful? How is it that you have no faith?

It is a choice to believe or to fear; let’s choose to believe. Believe in a hopeful future simply because God said it!

Leap of Faith

 

LEAP OF FAITH

by

PATRICIA BROUSSARD

From Cameron To Canton: Louisiana Son Becomes International Artist

By Patricia Broussard

(original article as written for Lagniappe)

Some people know early on what they want to do with their life. Others spend years searching, never feeling like they’ve found their purpose.

David Broussard, an artist and sculptor, not only uses his God-given talent to prosper, but, more importantly, to glorify God and bless others.

It wasn’t always that way. It took Broussard several decades to get to where he is today. It was a process of trial and painful growth, but he learned much along the way.

Broussard, the fifth child of Whitney and Clara Broussard’s eight children, was always a handful. Whether it was discovering the dead minnows stashed away in his T-shirt drawer, or catching him in the act of throwing eggs at his uncle’s chickens in the henhouse, the Broussards were always busy trying to keep up with their rambunctious son.

Broussard looks back on his childhood with the fondest of memories. “Daddy owned some great marsh land in Creole, and it was perfect for duck hunting. We’d leave early in the morning, and sometimes not get home until late at night. We didn’t have cell phones, but no one worried. Everyone knew each other, and watched out for each other. I hunted and fished, and explored the countryside with my friends. It was truly a great childhood.”

It wasn’t always fun and games, he adds. His father, teacher and principal at Cameron Elementary, also owned Broussard’s Motel. Every summer, Whitney Broussard would put a paintbrush in his son’s hands, and tell him to get to work. Every day for weeks, David would paint the outside of the motel while his friends played. When he finally finished that job, it was time to paint the inside.

“I hated that paintbrush,” he says. “When I got a little older, I told my Dad I was going to get a real job, and, along with a couple of friends, went to work on a Texaco production platform. The first job they gave us was to scrape and paint the rig. My Dad loved to hear me tell that story, and I can still see that grin on his face. I still paint, but now I paint with a blowtorch.”

David is energetic, and passionate about whatever he does. At the age of 15, the Broussard family moved from Cameron to Lake Charles. David had the opportunity to pick up a bass guitar, and hasn’t stopped playing since. He had found his first love, and pursued it passionately.

He honed his skills, playing with locals such as Gary Reynolds, Eric Sylvester and Charles Mann. Broussard played in several traveling bands, and after two years of touring countless cities, in 1975 found himself in Dallas. It was there that he met a successful hairdresser, and enjoyed her friends and lifestyle. He was encouraged to go to cosmetology school, and, in 1977, he earned his license, and started his career in the hair business. Quickly, he became a recognized name, all the while  continuing to play music locally.

refugee

David Broussard, Terry Murphy and Kenny Griffin of Refugee (early 1980s)

In 1982, his band, Refugee, was named one of the top 10 rock and roll bands in Texas on Q-102’s More Texas Crude album. A few months later, while flipping through channels on the radio, David heard Marlin Maddox’s voice, and was captivated. He continued to listen every day, and heard the gospel of Christ taught like he had never heard before.

Listening to teachers such as Chuck Smith and J. Vernon McGee, it wasn’t long before David made Jesus Lord of his life. He knew he had to make some serious decisions, and, shortly after, to the surprise of everyone, he quit Refugee only weeks before they were to sign with Epic Records. He made the decision to stay in the hair business, and share Christ with anyone who would listen. Many of his clients and associates became Christian as a result of seeing his transformation.

He stayed true to his decision, but things were about to change for him at the turn of the millennium.

brou-img0290-225x300

In December of 1999, David felt there was more for him to do. He prayed for God to expand his realm of influence. It wasn’t long before God answered that prayer.

In May of 2000, Broussard signed up for a 24-hour welding course. In this class, he made a cross, and hung it in his salon. It sold within an hour. He made another, which again sold immediately. After selling approximately 50 crosses, his business partner mentioned that God had definitely answered his prayer. He asked her what she meant. David was having so much fun with his new “hobby” that he didn’t realize this was indeed the answer to his prayer.

He started designing crosses in which the shape and name would tell a story — a story that pointed to Christ. In other words, David wasn’t simply making beautiful home decor — he was telling the story of man’s salvation through the cross.

Selling only from his salon, Broussard’s crosses began appearing in homes throughout the Dallas/Ft. Worth area. In 2001, his friends, who own the Dallas International Guitar Show, invited him to exhibit his crosses. They were a huge hit with musicians across America.

The next month, Broussard was accepted in ArtFest, a popular show in Dallas. This was the first time the general public in Dallas saw his creations, and from that point on, his career took off.

In 2003, the Dallas Observer named Broussard Best Men’s Hair Stylist. Even though his hair business was booming, he knew it was time to take another major step. Being very anxious with the decision that lay before him, but also believing the promise that the Lord would provide his needs, he gave up his clientele that he loved and worked so hard to build, and devoted his full attention to Jeweled Steel.

From the Foundation Cross
From the Foundation Cross

Many have asked why he calls his business Jeweled Steel. He explains that what a jeweler does with a stone, he does with steel. He cuts a particular shape out of steel, and then polishes different textures into the surface. He continues to polish the steel until it almost looks holographic. Then he colors the designs, using only the heat from a blowtorch, a technique he calls flame painting.

When he is finished painting, he signs each piece, then adds a clear powder coat to seal and protect the finish. The final product is a piece of steel that looks like glass. He says one of the greatest compliments he gets is when someone looks at his art and asks if it is glass. After almost 15 years of making these crosses, he still hears people say they’ve never seen anything like it.

Broussard has enjoyed great reviews of his art. Loretto Chapel, the top tourist attraction in Santa Fe, N.M., picked up his line to sell in their gift shop, and that relationship is still going strong after 10 years. Carmel Mission in Carmel, Cal., also carries his art.

World-famous sculptor Max Greiner discovered Broussard’s work in Nashville, and he wanted to get to know the artist behind the crosses. They met, and Greiner quickly became Broussard’s mentor. Greiner established The Coming King Prayer and Sculpture Garden in Kerrville, Texas, and asked Broussard to create a design for the garden. He created It Is Finished, a 12-ft. spike sculpture that represents the three nails used at the crucifixion. This impressive sculpture is located at the entrance of the garden, located at I-10 and Hwy. 16.

iif and empty cross

Through the years, Broussard has maintained his love of music, and he continues to play. The difference now is that he plays at church instead of smoky nightclubs.

Meanwhile his work continues to gain recognition. He’s been featured on WFAA Channel 8’s Good Morning Texas, as well as other Dallas publications. He was invited to exhibit with Let There Be Light, along with 12 other artists, including Max Greiner, Thomas Blackwell and Ron DiCiani, all of international fame. He’s even used his talent to finish the sign and awning on the restored Manor House, a 28-story apartment building located in downtown Dallas.

What began with a simple welding class, and selling one lone item in a hair salon, has turned into a global venture. Broussard’s work can be found not only in the USA, but also in New Zealand, Australia, Brazil, Columbia, Central America, Mexico, South Africa, Canada, Europe and Israel. Even the Church of England, after visiting Broussard’s website, commissioned him to create two custom designed crosses.

Each beautiful cross is signed; part of his signature is the scripture 2 Corinthians 5:17, because it describes his life: “Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; the old has gone, the new has come!”

BROU-DavidMichelle-200x300

David and Michelle Broussard

David’s wife and absolute love of his life, Michelle, not only runs the business end of Jeweled Steel, but also has taken her husband’s designs and created a jewelry line that complements his larger pieces. Many people wear their favorite Jeweled Steel designs as jewelry.

What pleases David the most is that his art and website allow people around the world to look at beautiful photos of his work, and read words of truth that can bring eternal life.

The Broussards recently moved to Canton, Texas, where they show their work every month at First Monday Trade Days. David says he meets people from Lake Charles and the surrounding area almost every month. He and Michelle can be found in Arbor 2, booths 162 and 163. They can be reached by phone at 903-567-4349, and their website is JeweledSteel.com.

In Lake Charles, Jeweled Steel can be found at The Perfect Gift, located at 3045 Ernest St.

Originally posted in Lagniappe Magazine.

First Monday Report – January

First Monday Report – January

David and I were talking about what we could do in order to make our blog and others postings more interesting.  We decided to add our monthly First Monday Report which will give some highlights of our weekend at First Monday Trade Days in Canton, TX.  Many of you have come out to see this monthly phenomenon knows at First Monday but many of you have not experienced it so we are bringing our experiences to you.  We will include some interesting sights and people as well as include our best sellers of the month.  If there is anything you would like to see us share, please let us know.

 

Brief History of First Monday

 

FM-in-1918-downtown-Canton

IT ALL BEGAN … in the 1850′s when the circuit judge stopped in Canton on the FIRST MONDAY of each month. This was the day the Judge held court. People from the area came to town on that day to conduct their business, stock their pantries and sit in on court proceedings … and watch a few “hangings”. History relates one incident where a man was hung for stealing his partner’s wagon of goods for trading. He is buried facing south (not east) in Hillcrest Cemetery by the First Monday grounds.

Quite naturally, many also brought their own goods, produce and livestock with them to sell or trade. This took place just off the west side of the courthouse square. Most history versions include the trading of wild hosrses, which were rounded up in the region and brought to Canton to sell.

By 1965, FIRST MONDAY had outgrown the Town Square, It was then that the City of Canton purchased six acres just two blocks north of the courthouse. FIRST MONDAY was moved off the square.

Originally, FIRST MONDAY only “happened” on the first Monday of each month. However, if you take a look NOW at the calendar, you will note that Monday has been excluded.

Even though the event goes from Thursday – Sunday, the name is now and will forever be known as: FIRST MONDAY TRADE DAYS.

Source:  http://www.firstmondaycanton.com/history-first-monday-trade-days

 

Interesting Sights

Those that are regulars at First Monday know that there are lots and lots of dogs.  Dogs of all sizes and shapes come with their owners every month.  Here are a few dogs that visited our booth this month.

 

Ms. Arden Elizabeth from Austin came to see our booth. She was decked out and ready to celebrate the New Year.   Arden has been featured in several calendars and is also a therapy dog.   Arden and her mother are from Austin.

Ms. Arden Elizabeth

 

This long-haired dachshund has an interesting leash.

 

weinie dog with leash

 

Jeweled Steel January Bestseller

 

deep in heart of texas

We have recently debuted one of David’s new designs called “Deep in the Heart of Texas”.  This was created when my mom wanted something different than a cross for her office.  David came up with this and they have been very popular.  The one in the photo is approx 26″ x 26″.

Canton Cajun Guest House

As most of you know, David and I recently moved to Canton, Tx.  The property contains  8 acres of land in addition to a 2 bedroom/2 bathroom guest house, a separate game room/family room with full bath and our main house.  We also have an wonderful patio as well as David’s shop and the Jeweled Steel offices in the back.

The property is incredibly peaceful.  We wanted to offer our guest house as an escape for those wanting to disconnect from technology in order to reconnect with God, self and others. When we first moved out here in August we had no internet or phone service for 2 weeks.  It took us about 3 days to detox from being connected, yes we did have some withdrawals.  Cell phone service is very limited out here for all carriers so our cell phones only worked in certain locations around the property therefore we had to get a landline.

If you would like some info on renting our guest house for the evening or weekend please call us at 903-567-4349.  You can also email me at Michelle@JeweledSteel.com.

Each bedroom has its own private bathroom.  There is coffee service available in the guest house as well as a refrigerator so you can bring any snacks or drinks that you like.

David and I really enjoy getting to know all the wonderful people that stay here.  If you have any other questions about the guest house or surrounding area please don’t hesitate to call or email.

We also have the game room/family room available for rent but I will write about that in a separate post.

 

Here are some pictures

Front of the property.  The main house in on the left, the guest house is thru the car port and the game room/family room is on the right.

Front-of-main-house

Close up of the main house, guest house and game room/family room.  Guest house has the sliding glass doors

front-of-house

 

 

 

 

 

Air Chairs we have hanging in a front oak tree.  These are really comfortable and so relaxing.

:Front-house-view-air-chairs

Main living area and Kitchenette

Kitchenette-2Living-area

 

Hallway leading to the bedrooms

Hallway

First Bedroom.  King size bed and private bathroom with shower.

Bedroom-1-King-BedBedroom-1-King-Bed-2

 

Bathroom-1

Second bedroom.  2 twin size beds and private bathroom with shower.  This shower is handicapped accessible.

Bedroom-2-Twin-BedBedroom-2-Twin-Bed-Bath

 

Patio

Patio Patio-2

View from the driveway

front-view-of-driveway

If you have any questions or are interested in booking a room please call us at 903-567-4349 or email  me at Michelle@JeweledSteel.com.

Ever wonder how the word ‘Passion’ became linked to Jesus’ crucifixion?

Ever wonder how the word ‘Passion’ became linked to the Jesus’ crucifixion?

Pictured:  Passion Wall Cross

Scroll down to see a short video of David explaining the meaning of his Passion Wall Cross

From Wikipedia

Read More:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passion_%28Christianity%29

Have you ever wondered how the term “Passion” became linked to the resurrection of Jesus?  I did, so I did a quick Google search and found this on Wikipedia.

In Christianity, the Passion (translation of Greek πάσχειν paschein, ‘to suffer’[1][2]) is the short final period in the life of Jesus covering his visit to Jerusalem and leading to his execution by crucifixion, an event central to Christian beliefs.

It begins with his triumphal entry into Jerusalem and includes his Last Supper, Agony in the Garden and his arrest and trial. Those parts of the four Gospels that describe these events, as well as the non-canonical Gospel of Peter, are known as the “Passion narratives”. In theliturgical calendar, the Passion is commemorated in Holy Week, beginning on Palm Sunday and ending on Easter Saturday.

The word passion has since taken on a more general application and now may also apply to accounts of the suffering and death ofChristian martyrs, sometimes using the Latin form passio..

The accounts of the Passion are found in the four canonical gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. Three of these, Matthew, Mark, and Luke, known as the Synoptic Gospels, give very similar accounts. The Gospel of John accounts varies slightly.

The events include:

  • Triumphal entry into Jerusalem, Cleansing of the Temple,
  • The conspiracy against Jesus by the Jewish chief priests and the teachers of the law.[4][5][6]
  • A meal a few days before Passover. A woman anoints Jesus. He says that for this she will always be remembered.
  • In Jerusalem, the Last Supper shared by Jesus and his disciples. Jesus gives final instructions, predicts his betrayal, and tells them all to remember him.
  • On the path to Gethsemane after the meal. Jesus tells them they will all fall away that night; after Peter protests he will not, Jesus says Peter will deny him three times before the cock crows.
  • Gethsemane, later that night. As the disciples rest, Jesus prays; then Judas Iscariot leads in either “a detachment of soldiers and some officials from the chief priests and Pharisees”[7] (accompanied according to Luke’s Gospel by the chief priests and elders),[8] or a “large crowd armed with swords and clubs, sent from the chief priests and elders of the people,”[9][10] which arrests Jesus; all his disciples run away. During the arrest in Gethsemane, someone (Peter according to John) takes a sword and cuts off the ear of the high priest’s servant, Malchus.
  • The high priest’s palace, later that night. The arresting party brings Jesus to the Sanhedrin (Jewish supreme court); according to Luke’s Gospel, Jesus is beaten by his Jewish guards prior to his examination;[11] the court examines him, in the course of which, according to John’s Gospel, Jesus is struck in the face by one of the Jewish officials;[12] the court determine he deserves to die (see Sanhedrin Trial of Jesus). According to Matthew’s Gospel, the court then “spat in his face and struck him with their fists.”[13] They then send him to Pontius Pilate. According to the synoptic gospels, the high priest who examines Jesus is Caiaphas; in John, Jesus is also interrogated by Annas, Caiaiphas’ father-in-law.
  • The courtyard outside the high priest’s palace, the same time. Peter has followed Jesus and joined the mob awaiting Jesus’ fate; they suspect he is a sympathizer, so Peter denies he knows Jesus. Suddenly the cock crows and Peter remembers what Jesus had said.
  • The governor’s palace, early morning. Pilate, the Roman governor, examines Jesus, decides he is innocent; the Jewish leaders and the crowd demand Jesus’ death; Pilate gives them the choice of saving Barabbas, a criminal, or saving Jesus. In response to the screaming mob Pilate sends Jesus out to be crucified. According to the Gospel of Matthew, Judas, the betrayer, is filled with remorse and tries to return the money he was paid for betraying Jesus. When the high priests say that that is his affair, Judas throws the money into the temple, goes off, and hangs himself.[14]
  • Golgotha, a hill outside Jerusalem, later morning through mid afternoon. Jesus is crucified and dies.

 

The Gospel of Luke states that Pilate sends Jesus to be judged by Herod Antipas because as a Galilean he is under his jurisdiction. Herod is excited at first to see Jesus and hopes Jesus will perform a miracle for him; he asks Jesus several questions but Jesus does not answer. Herod then mocks him and sends him back to Pilate after giving him an “elegant” robe to wear.[15]

All the Gospels have a man named Barabbas[16] released by Pilate instead of Jesus. Matthew, Mark and John have Pilate offer a choice between Jesus and Barabbas to the crowd; Luke lists no choice offered by Pilate, but represents the crowd demanding his release.

In all the Gospels, Pilate asks Jesus if he is King of the Jews and Jesus replies “So you say”. Once condemned by Pilate, he was floggedbefore execution. The Canonical Gospels, except Luke, record that Jesus is then taken by the soldiers to the Praetorium where, according to Matthew and Mark, the whole contingent of soldiers has been called together. They place a purple robe on him, put a crown of thornson his head, and according to Matthew, put a rod in his hand. They mock him by hailing him as “King of the Jews“, paying homage and hitting him on the head with the rod.

According to the Gospel of John, Pilate has Jesus brought out a second time, wearing the purple robe and the crown of thorns, in order to appeal his innocence before the crowd, saying Ecce homo, (“Behold the man”). But, John represents, the priests urge the crowd to demand Jesus’ death. Pilate resigns himself to the decision, washing his hands (according to Matthew) before the people as a sign that Jesus’ blood will not be upon him. According to the Gospel of Matthew they replied, “His blood be on us and on our children![17]

Mark and Matthew record that Jesus is returned his own clothes, prior to being led out for execution. According to the Gospel accounts he is forced, like other victims of crucifixion, to drag his own cross to Golgotha,[18] the location of the execution. The three Synoptic Gospelsrefer to a man called Simon of Cyrene who is made to carry the cross (Mark 15:21, Matthew 27:32, Luke 23:26), while in the Gospel of John (19:17) Jesus is made to carry His own cross. The Gospel of Mark gives the names of Simon’s children, Alexander and Rufus.However, the Gospel of Luke refers to Simon carrying the cross after Jesus, in that it states: “they laid hold upon one Simon, a Cyrenian, coming out of the country, and on him they laid the cross, that he might bear it after Jesus”.[19] Luke adds that Jesus’ female followers follow, mourning his fate, but that he responds by quoting Hosea 10:8

The Synoptic Gospels state that on arrival at Golgotha, Jesus is offered wine laced with myrrh to lessen the pain, but he refuses it. Jesus is then crucified, according to Mark, at “the third hour” (9 AM) the morning after the Passover meal, but according to John he is handed over to be crucified at “the sixth hour” (noon) the day before the Passover meal, although many resolve this by saying that the Synoptics use Jewish time, and that John uses Roman time. Pilate has a plaque fixed to Jesus’ cross inscribed, (according to John) in Hebrew, Greek and Latin –Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudeorum,[20] meaning Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews. Mark has the plaque say simply, King of the Jews. The Gospels then state that the soldiers divide Jesus’ clothes among themselves, except for one garment for which they cast lots. The Gospel of John claims that this fulfills a prophecy from Psalms 22:18. Some of the crowd who have been following taunt Jesus, saying “He trusts in God; let God deliver him now!”, and suggest that Jesus might perform a miracle to release himself from the cross.

According to the Gospels, two thieves are also crucified, one on each side of him. According to Luke, one of the thieves reviles Jesus, while the other declares Jesus innocent and begs that he might be remembered when Jesus comes to his kingdom (see Penitent thief).

John records that Mary, his mother, and two other women stand by the cross as does a disciple, described as the one whom Jesus loved. Jesus commits his mother to this disciple’s care. According to the synoptics, the sky becomes dark at midday and the darkness lasts for three hours, until the ninth hour when Jesus cries out Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani? (“My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”)[21] The centurion standing guard, who has seen how Jesus has died, declares Jesus innocent (Luke) or the “Son of God” (Matthew, Mark).

John says that, as was the custom, the soldiers come and break the legs of the thieves, so that they will die faster, but that on coming to Jesus they find him already dead. A soldier pierces his side with a spear.

Read More:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passion_%28Christianity%29

 

Predictable or Unpredictable – which do you choose?

predictable

I was looking through Flipbook today and ran across this article in the Atlantic entitled, How Uncertainty Fuels Anxiety As I began to read it, several things stood out which seem to support the notion that people don’t like uncertainty and would choose the predictable over the unpredictable, even if it is a predicted bad outcome. The article went on to cite a study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology from 1966 which states that humans would prefer an electric shock now than maybe get one at a later time. I began to think about which I would prefer and realized this is the point in the article that I would to interject Faith. We do have a choice as to what we believe, Job (Job 3:25) said that the thing he greatly feared has come upon him and if you are familiar with the story of Job you know a lot of really bad things came upon him. If you are not familiar with Job, you may want to read it.

So how do our expectations play into the outcome of the events in our lives? Would you rather have a bad thing happen to you at a predicted time rather than believe that nothing bad will happen to you at all? The following is a general conclusion to the article:

     “So not knowing what to do, not knowing what’s going to happen, not knowing what other people are thinking and        feeling – these situation are ripe to breed anxiety in anyone, depending on how well they’re able to tolerate uncertainty.”

As I read this I began to once again realize the importance of renewing our minds and aligning our thoughts with the Word of God. In Malachi 3:6, God says, He does not change. In Revelation 1:8, Jesus says that He is the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending, which is and which was and which is to come. James 1:17 says that every good and perfect gift comes from above and there is no variableness in Him. Sounds pretty predictable and certain to me!

Things do not always work out like expected and definitely bad things happen but I believe that in these times we have to believe God unchangeable and unmovable. He created us and appointed the time and place for us to live (Acts 17:26) and that the thoughts that He has about us are of peace and not evil to give us a hopeful end (Jeremiah 29:11)

What are you choosing to believe today?  Let’s choose to put our faith in the King of Kings and Lord of Lords.

Read the article “How uncertainty fuels anxiety.”

Who was Saint Patrick?

Who was Saint Patrick?

Picture:  Celtic Fish Wall Cross

Taken from the History Channel

http://www.history.com/topics/st-patricks-day/who-was-saint-patrick

St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is one of Christianity’s most widely known figures. But for all his celebrity, his life remains somewhat of a mystery. Many of the stories traditionally associated with St. Patrick, including the famous account of his banishing all the snakes from Ireland, are false, the products of hundreds of years of exaggerated storytelling.

It is known that St. Patrick was born in Britain to wealthy parents near the end of the fourth century. He is believed to have died on March 17, around 460 A.D. Although his father was a Christian deacon, it has been suggested that he probably took on the role because of tax incentives and there is no evidence that Patrick came from a particularly religious family. At the age of 16, Patrick was taken prisoner by a group of Irish raiders who were attacking his family’s estate. They transported him to Ireland where he spent six years in captivity. (There is some dispute over where this captivity took place. Although many believe he was taken to live in Mount Slemish in County Antrim, it is more likely that he was held in County Mayo near Killala.) During this time, he worked as a shepherd, outdoors and away from people. Lonely and afraid, he turned to his religion for solace, becoming a devout Christian. (It is also believed that Patrick first began to dream of converting the Irish people to Christianity during his captivity.)

After more than six years as a prisoner, Patrick escaped. According to his writing, a voice—which he believed to be God’s—spoke to him in a dream, telling him it was time to leave Ireland.

To do so, Patrick walked nearly 200 miles from County Mayo, where it is believed he was held, to the Irish coast. After escaping to Britain, Patrick reported that he experienced a second revelation—an angel in a dream tells him to return to Ireland as a missionary. Soon after, Patrick began religious training, a course of study that lasted more than 15 years. After his ordination as a priest, he was sent to Ireland with a dual mission: to minister to Christians already living in Ireland and to begin to convert the Irish. (Interestingly, this mission contradicts the widely held notion that Patrick introduced Christianity to Ireland.)

Familiar with the Irish language and culture, Patrick chose to incorporate traditional ritual into his lessons of Christianity instead of attempting to eradicate native Irish beliefs. For instance, he used bonfires to celebrate Easter since the Irish were used to honoring their gods with fire. He also superimposed a sun, a powerful Irish symbol, onto the Christian cross to create what is now called a Celtic cross, so that veneration of the symbol would seem more natural to the Irish. Although there were a small number of Christians on the island when Patrick arrived, most Irish practiced a nature-based pagan religion. The Irish culture centered around a rich tradition of oral legend and myth. When this is considered, it is no surprise that the story of Patrick’s life became exaggerated over the centuries—spinning exciting tales to remember history has always been a part of the Irish way of life.

 

Davidic Code Wall Cross

Davidic Code Wall Cross

Davidic Code Wall Cross
Davidic Code Wall Cross

 

Hi, my name is David Broussard located here in Dallas, TX.  I get my inspiration from a lot of different areas and I remember a few years back, Dan Brown came out with DaVinci Code so came out with the Davidic Code.

This cross is the Lord’s Prayer. I take out all the punctuation and spaces in between the words and it has a code like effect.

Watch the short video below and let David explain to you in his own words the meaning of the Davidic Code Wall Cross.

We also have several different versions of the Davidic Code Wall Cross, you can see the pictures below.

For More Information

Davidic Code Contemporary Wall Cross

 

Davidic Bronze 2

 

Davidic Code Traditional Wall Cross

 

Davidic Code Traditional
Davidic Code Traditional

A Brief History on the Lord’s Prayer

(taken from Encyclopedia Britannica)

Lord’s Prayer, Latin Oratio Dominica, also called Pater Noster,  (Latin: “Our Father”),prayer taught by Jesus to his disciples, and the principal prayer used by all Christians in common worship. It appears in two forms in the New Testament, the shorter version in Luke 11:2–4 and the longer version, part of the Sermon on the Mount, in Matthew 6:9–13. In both contexts it is offered as a model of how to pray. Many scholars believe the version in Luke to be closer to the original, the extra phrases in Matthew’s version having been added in liturgical use.

The Lord’s Prayer resembles other prayers that came out of the Jewish matrix of Jesus’ time and contains three common Jewish elements: praise, petition, and a yearning for the coming Kingdom of God. It consists of an introductory address and seven petitions. The Matthean version used by the Roman Catholic church is as follows:

Our Father who art in Heaven,

Hallowed be thy name;

Thy kingdom come;

Thy will be done

On earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread;

And forgive us our trespasses

As we forgive those who trespass against us;

And lead us not into temptation,

But deliver us from evil.

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18 Nail Wall Cross

18 Nail Wall Cross

18 Nail Wall Cross
18 Nail Wall Cross

 

    Hi, this is David Broussard from Dallas, Tx. I make several designs of nail crosses but this is probably my favorite. It’s called an 18 Nail Wall Cross.

In Hebrew, the 18th letter of the alphabet is pronounced ‘chai’ and it means life. It’s ironic that the cross is an instrument of death but when we come to it, we get life. 18 Nail Cross…….Life.

 The vertical arm has 12 nails representing the tribes of Israel. The cross bar has 6 nails representing the number of man.

Watch the short video below to hear David describe the meaning of the 18 Nail Wall Cross.

More Information

More Information on “Chai”

Chai (Hebrew: חַי‎ “living” ḥay) is a Hebrew word that figures prominently in modern Jewish culture; the Hebrew letters of the word are often used as a visual symbol.

According to the secular, Socialist affiliated Jewish Daily Forward, its use as an amulet is very recent, originating in stories from 18th century Eastern Europe first used in amulets from the mid 20th century.

Chai as a symbol goes back to medieval Spain at the latest. Letters as symbols in Jewish culture go back to the earliest Jewish roots, the Talmud states that the world was created from Hebrew letters which form verses of the Torah. In medieval Kabballah; Chai is the lowest (closest to the physical plane) emanation of God. According to 16th Century Greek rabbi Shelomo Hacohen Soloniki; in his commentary on the Zohar, Chai as a symbol has its linkage in the Kabalah texts to God’s attribute of ‘Ratzon’, or motivation, will, muse. The Jewish commentaries give an especially long treatment to certain verses in the Torah with the word as their central theme. 3 examples are Leviticus 18 וָחַי בָּהֶם ‘Chai Bahem’, ‘and you shall live by [this faith]’ (as opposed to just doing it), this is part of the section dealing with the legacy of Moses Our Teacher following his death. Deuteronomy 31:9 ” רְאֵה נָתַתִּי לְפָנֶיךָ הַיּוֹם, אֶת-הַחַיִּים וְאֶת-הַטּוֹב, וְאֶת-הַמָּוֶת, וְאֶת-הָרָע. 15 “Verily, I have set before thee this day life and good, and death and evil,in that I command thee this day to love the LORD thy God, to walk in His ways, and to keep His commandments and His statutes and His ordinances; then thou shalt live.” There is nigh an ancient Jewish commentator who does not comment on that verse. The Shema prayer as well speaks of the importance of Chai, to live and walk in the Jewish cultural lifestyle.

Chai (Hebrew: חַי‎ “living” ḥay) is a Hebrew word that figures prominently in modern Jewish culture; the Hebrew letters of the word are often used as a visual symbol.

According to the secular, Socialist affiliated Jewish Daily Forward, its use as an amulet is very recent, originating in stories from 18th century Eastern Europe first used in amulets from the mid 20th century.

Chai as a symbol goes back to medieval Spain at the latest. Letters as symbols in Jewish culture go back to the earliest Jewish roots, the Talmud states that the world was created from Hebrew letters which form verses of the Torah. In medieval Kabballah; Chai is the lowest (closest to the physical plane) emanation of God. According to 16th Century Greek rabbi Shelomo Hacohen Soloniki; in his commentary on the Zohar, Chai as a symbol has its linkage in the Kabalah texts to God’s attribute of ‘Ratzon’, or motivation, will, muse. The Jewish commentaries give an especially long treatment to certain verses in the Torah with the word as their central theme. 3 examples are Leviticus 18 וָחַי בָּהֶם ‘Chai Bahem’, ‘and you shall live by [this faith]’ (as opposed to just doing it), this is part of the section dealing with the legacy of Moses Our Teacher following his death. Deuteronomy 31:9 ” רְאֵה נָתַתִּי לְפָנֶיךָ הַיּוֹם, אֶת-הַחַיִּים וְאֶת-הַטּוֹב, וְאֶת-הַמָּוֶת, וְאֶת-הָרָע. 15 “Verily, I have set before thee this day life and good, and death and evil,in that I command thee this day to love the LORD thy God, to walk in His ways, and to keep His commandments and His statutes and His ordinances; then thou shalt live.” There is nigh an ancient Jewish commentator who does not comment on that verse. The Shema prayer as well speaks of the importance of Chai, to live and walk in the Jewish cultural lifestyle.

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